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Diane Randon, the Senior Official Perfoming the Duties of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs), and the Deputy to the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, holds a letter from her parents sent in 1955 to demonstrate the importance of communication and engagement during the Employee Engagement Training Conference Held at Fort Leavenworth March 21-22. The event brought together supervisors of Army Civilians from around the world.
Combined Arms Center Commanding General, Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, walks "Objective Polar" with Brig. Gen. Gary M. Brito, Commanding General of JRTC and Fort Polk, La., and members of the Joint Readiness Training Center's Live Fire Team on March 16 at Fort Polk.
United States Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth Commanding General Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy chaired a panel entitled "Prerequisite for Success in Multi-Domain Battle: Modifications to Training, Technology and Materiel" at the 2017 Association of the United States Army Institute of Land Warfare Global Force Symposium and Exposition in Huntsville Ala., Tuesday, March 14. Also on the panel were Brig. Gen. Maria Gervais, deputy commanding general of U.S. Army Combined Arms Center - Training; Maj. Gen. John S. Kem, deputy commandant of the U.S.
Troopers from the 11th Armored Cavalry prepare a casualty to be evacuated from the combat zone after securing a Helicopter Landing Zone during their air assault raid at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017. The intent of this exercise was to restore strategic communications, which are decisive to the regiment's mission command for military operations. (Photo by Pvt. Austin Anyzeski)
The U.S. Army Command and General Staff College hosted British Lt. Gen. Nicholas Arthur William Pope, CBE, deputy chief of the General Staff, in the 2017 Kermit Roosevelt Exchange Lecture Series. His lecture was entitled "The Special relationship… viewed from the end of the telescope" and focused on the relationship between the U.S. and British militaries. "There is a special relationship between our countries," Pope said, "Relationships can start in the most obscure place, for the most obscure reasons.
Under the watchful eye of the instructor, a trainee sends rounds down range. The M2 has varying cyclic rates of fire, depending on the model. The M2HB (heavy barrel) air-cooled ground gun has a cyclical rate of 450-575 rounds per minute. The early M2 water-cooled AA guns had a cyclical rate of around 450–600 rpm. (Photo by: Patrick A. Albright/MCoE PAO Photographer) Click the photo above to see more.
Two hundred students from the United Kingdom's Intermediate Command and Staff College (Land) arrive at Fort Leavenworth for a two-week exercise the end of February. Exercise Eagle Owl kicked off Feb. 27 at the U.S. Army's Command and General Staff College and concludes March 9. The exercise is designed to give a shared understanding of U.S. and United Kingdom military cultural and procedural similarities and differences, gain experience in brigade-level deliberate planning, and build professional relationships to facilitate future partnerships.
The Center for Army Leadership (CAL) hosted its 19th Army Leadership Exchange event, featuring Dr. Richard S. Faulkner, professor of Military History at the Command and General Staff College Friday, Feb. 24. Faulkner is the author of "The School of Hard Knocks: Combat Leadership in the American Expeditionary Forces."
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What is CAC?

What is CAC

The US Army Combined Arms Center (CAC) is the force modernization proponent for unified land operations, combined arms operations at echelons above brigade (Division, Corps and Theater Army), mission command, airspace control, information operations, irregular warfare, knowledge management, personnel recovery, OPSEC, military deception, security force assistance, and the Army Profession. CAC is also the US Army’s lead organization for lessons learned, doctrine, training, education, and leader development managing the Army Leader Development Program, Army Profession Program, Army Training Support System Enterprise, Army Training and Education Management Enterprise and the Combat Training Center Program. CAC is made up of more than 32,000 Soldiers and Army Civilian Corps employees stationed throughout the United States, Europe, Korea and SW Asia at eight centers of excellence, 16 branch schools, and seven non-branch schools. The Combined Arms Center synchronizes 37 US Army schools through Army University educating and training more than 350,000 students annually, including nearly 10,000 students from 86 separate nations and over 10,000 sailors, airmen, and Marines from the Joint Force.

Centers of Excellence

Branch Schools

IN AR AV FA ADA MI Cyber SC EN
MP CBRN OD QM AG TC FI SF MED

Non-Branch Schools

While CAC's physical footprint is finite...the influence created from the collective efforts of it's parts is not.

What CAC Does

What CAC Does

The US Army Combined Arms Center develops requirements across doctrine, organizations, training, materiel, leader development and education, personnel, facilities, and policy (DOTMLPF-P) for divisions, corps, and theater armies while synchronizing and integrating doctrine, training, education, and leader development across the six warfighting function proponents. This is all accomplished through CAC’s US Army and TRADOC core roles and functions.

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The Combined Arms Center further executes professional military education and functional training through branch and non-branch schools, as well as provides individual and collective training and education support through enabling capabilities. This allows CAC to provide the Army with agile, adaptive, innovative, and expert professional Soldiers and leaders in highly capable combined arms formations which are ready and able to conduct unified land operations to prevent, shape, and win in the complex and contested operational environment.

Doctrine

Doctrine

Doctrine is the Army’s expert body of knowledge. It serves as the starting point for organizations and leaders to think about and conduct operations based on current capabilities and executable by forces currently in existence. It is dynamic and changing based on lessons learned in current operations and training, adaptive enemies, and shifts in force structure, technology, and social values. Doctrine is the language of the Army professional.



Training

Training Development

Training is the means by which US Army professionals prepare for future operations and build readiness across the force. The Combined Arms Center – Training (CAC-T), supports and enhances individual and collective home station training and training conducted at the combat training centers in order to build readiness and capabilities that support US Army and joint force commanders. In order to develop agile leaders and versatile, ready units, training is conducted to standard in a realistic, complex training environment with adequate repetition to gain mastery of the required individual and collective tasks.

Training Support and Development

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Education

Education

The Combined Arms Center synchronizes education across the force through Army University (Army U) to ensure an applicable common core throughout the Total Army, while working with the operating force to capture, understand, validate, and apply operational lessons learned to professional military education programs. US Army educational organizations help maintain a relevant, agile, and informed force for US Army and joint force commanders. The Army Operating Concept 2014: Winning in a Complex World, recognizes the imperative of creating a culture of career-long learning within the US Army that facilitates continued development of agile, adaptive, and innovative leaders who thrive in complex environments. Education is critically important because the Army educates for uncertainty. The educational development of characteristics such as critical thinking, ethical reasoning, judgment, situational understanding, and problem-solving must accompany hard tactical and technical skills acquired in training.

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Leader Development

Leader Development

Leader development is the deliberate, continuous, and progressive process—founded in army values—that grows Soldiers and Army Civilian Corps employees into highly competent, committed, professional leaders of character. Leader development is achieved through the career-long synthesis of the training, education, and experiences acquired through opportunities in the institutional (professional military education), operational (training and experience), and self-development (structured, guided, and personal) domains, supported by peer and developmental relationships. The Combined Arms Center helps produce professional leaders that practice the mission command philosophy whether conducting unified land operations or US Army generating force functions. The US Army strives to have leaders who are not only prepared for their current position, but also preparing for their progressive responsibilities.

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CAC's Force Modernization (FM) Responsibilities

CAC's Force Modernization (FM) Responsibilities

The US Army Combined Arms Center is the force modernization proponent for unified land operations, combined arms operations for echelons above brigade, and mission command. CAC also serves as the proponent for airspace control, information operations, operational security, knowledge management, military deception, security force assistance, irregular warfare, personnel recovery, and the Army Profession. As a proponent, CAC is primarily responsible for identifying capability gaps and developing DOTMLPF-P requirements, DOTL solutions and future concepts for each of these assigned areas.

FM Proponent Responsibilities

Unified Land Operations
Combined Arms Operations EAB
Mission Command

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CAC Enabling Proponencies

Airspace Control
Information Operations
Operation Security
Knowledge Management
Military Deception
Security Force Assistance
Irregular Warfare
Personnel Recovery
Army Profession

MCCoE
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Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned

Through the Center for Army Lessons Learned and the eight Centers of Excellence, the Combined Arms Center creates a knowledge sharing culture within the Army in which every Soldier and Army Civilian Corps employee is a discoverer and user of information, with the intent of driving continuous collection and sharing of observations from every unit level. The lessons learned program provides a system in which discovered lessons and best practices are validated and corrective actions are implemented into doctrine, training, education, leader development and operations. This is accomplished through a network of commands, units, and organizations continuously collaborating on observations to facilitate the integration and sharing of lessons and best practices. The program further improves the implementation of recommended changes to determine effectiveness in addressing identified issues. Finally, CAC offers the force a rapid issue resolution process to hasten the dissemination of critical information gathered from the field to resolve issues of importance to commanders and to save the lives of Soldiers.

Army Profession

Army Profession

Through the Center for the Army Profession and Ethic, the Combined Arms Center strengthens America’s Army as a military profession that inspires trusted Army professionals to honorably fulfill their oaths of service. This program supports army-wide efforts to further enhance Soldier and Army Civilian Corps employee professionalism by creating and integrating profession, ethics, and character development doctrine into training, professional military education, the civilian education system, and operations.

SHARP Safeline

SHARP Safeline

The Sexual Harassment / Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) Resource Center provides awareness and prevention, training and education, victim advocacy, response, reporting and follow up for sexual harassment and assault issues. Army policy promotes sensitive care, advocacy, treatment, reporting options for victims and accountability for those who commit sexual harassment and assault crimes.

Call the Installation SHARP Hotline at (913) 683-1443.
Available 24 / 7 and is CONFIDENTIAL.

For more information click here.

British, Canadian, and American Forces conduct a combined arms operation to cross the Rhine.