Mission Command Center of Excellence (MCCoE)

Mission Command Center of Excellence (MCCoE)View All News Updates »

Brig. Gen. James J. Mingus, director, Mission Command Center of Excellence, welcomes participants to the Nov. 8-10 Digital Liaison Detachment (DLD) Conference at Fort Leavenworth. More than 70 commanders, doctrine writers and training developers represent Active and Reserve units and organizations, including: HQs DA, FORSCOM and TRADOC; National Guard Bureau; and Theater Armies. They are meeting at the McHugh Training Center to discuss and produce DLD doctrine, organizational, training and other solutions. This conference marks the initial effort for the DLD proponent to establish a common framework and shared understanding of unit operations and DLD requirements...Read More
ADP 3-0 is one of the Army’s two capstone doctrine publications; the other is ADP 1, The Army. ADP 3-0 presents overarching doctrinal guidance and direction for conducting operations. It constitutes the Army’s view of how it conducts prompt and sustained operations on land and sets the foundation for developing the other principles, tactics, techniques, and procedures detailed in subordinate doctrine publications. Find it on line at: http://www.apd.army.mil/ ...Read More
Col. Yasutatsu Adachi, director of Japan Center for Ground Self-Defense Force Lessons Learned, conducted an orientation visit with Center for Army Lessons Learned. During his trip, Adachi met with the CALL director, deputy director, and division chiefs, strengthening collaboration between the U.S. Army and GSDF Lessons Learned centers. At the conclusion of the visit, Col. Michael Pappal, CALL director, presented Adachi with a plaque as a token of gratitude for the continued bond between the two organizations....Read More
Brig. Gen. James J. Mingus assumed responsibility as director of Mission Command Center of Excellence in a ceremony at Fort Leavenworth Monday, Sept. 26. Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, hosted the event....Read More
The Combined Arms Center and Army Press are proud to announce the publication of "Mission Command in the 21st Century." This collection of articles offers expanded examples on the practice of Mission Command in widely varied settings, all intended to sharpen the understanding of the Army’s central leadership philosophy. Download your copy by clicking the picture above....Read More
CSI Press has released 16 Cases of Mission Command in iBook format. This book offers historical illustrations of military leaders using the principles of Mission Command in battle. The cases included range from the War of 1812 to operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Each chapter includes a brief historical narrative followed by a discussion of the Mission Command principles displayed in the action. Since its first publication in 2013, 16 Cases had been adopted by JRTC and a large number of OPD programs to assist in teaching Mission Command doctrine to Soldiers of all ranks. To download a free copy of this iBook click here....Read More

The Mission Command Network describes the operational capabilities that must be provided within the context of the Army Operating Concept. The Army faces a complex world which demands 'expeditionary' forces - forces task organized and deployed on short notice to austere locations, capable of conducting operations immediately upon arrival. These forces will conduct expeditionary maneuver in order to win against increasingly capable and elusive enemies. Such maneuver will employ joint combined arms, air-ground forces quickly across multiple domains and extended distances. Expeditionary maneuver will combine military, inter-organizational, and multinational capabilities delivered from global, theater, and local resources. Hence we require an approach to mission command that fully integrates unified action partners, and all elements of power they can bring to bear.

The Mission Command Network is key to achieving this integration. The "Mission Command Network (MC Network)" is integrated mission command and LandWarNet capabilities, which enable commanders, leaders & soldiers to exercise mission command (the philosophy) and integrate all warfighting functions and Unified Action enablers (the warfighting function). It is an inherent component of the Joint Information Environment. The MC Network allows commanders to develop and maintain situational understanding, maneuver across domains and locations, and conduct joint combined arms operations to accomplish the mission. (Click the image to read the entire document)

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WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Oct. 12, 2015) — Today, the Army launched a new website, “Not In My Squad Assessment Resource,” or NIMS, a tool designed to help improve squad leaders’ professional development and make good squads even greater, said Sgt. Maj. David L. Stewart.

Stewart, who is sergeant major of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Center for the Army Profession and Ethic, known as CAPE, located at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, said that as the Army lead for the “Not In My Squad” initiative, CAPE designed this online resource as a way to help the sergeant major of the Army, or SMA, in that initiative.

The online assessment focuses on four areas:

  • Shared identity of trusted Army professionals
  • Standards and discipline
  • Professional climate
  • Esprit de corps

HOW IT WORKS

In June, the SMA invited 32 of the best squad leaders from around the Army to the Pentagon to discuss how junior noncommissioned officers can further build and sustain a climate of dignity, respect, trust and inclusion, Stewart said.

CAPE listened in on that discussion and used the squad leaders’ feedback to design the assessment, which consists of 24 statements related to NIMS focus areas. For example, one statement reads: “In my squad, we feel a conflict between loyalty to each other and doing what is right.” Those who participate in the assessment will be asked to rate how strongly they agree or disagree with that statement.

Once the evaluation is taken, results are immediately calculated and are available to the Soldier, said Timothy B. Lempicki, a CAPE knowledge management consultant.

If the Soldier wishes, he or she can share a link of those results with other squad members. The link will not give that Soldier’s name or other identifier, just the numerical results by category.

Another feature is that once the assessment is completed, the Soldier will see how well he or she scored compared to everyone else who participated, Lempicki aid. Over time, as more and more data comes in, it should offer an even better comparison.

An important note on terminology: Stewart said he uses the term “squad” and “squad leader,” but in some of the non-combat arms branches, the term team, “crew” or “section leader” can be substituted.

While the assessment is designed with the squad-level in mind, higher formations like platoons or even companies could use it as well, Stewart said. Senior noncommissioned officers, officers and Army civilians might even be interested in using it too.

Taking the test is voluntary and shouldn’t take longer than 10 or 15 minutes, he said.

Ideally, members of the squad will take it at the same time, share their results, and then have a group discussion on ways they can improve, he said. The squad leader may or may not have the same perception about the squad that the junior Soldiers have. It could be an interesting and sometimes eye-opening experience for them to share, he said.

To aid the squad in improving, the assessment links the Soldier with training and education materials, Stewart said. As more helpful and relevant resources become available, those will be added to the site over time.

Stewart suggested taking the assessment more than once to see if there’s any improvement. He said there’s no limit to how many times the assessment can be taken, and it’s easy to take, since a common access card is not needed to log onto the site.

Stewart said when he was a squad leader years ago, the assessment would have been a welcome tool for leader and Soldier development. Soldiers with a lot of drive and initiative won’t be disappointed with its effectiveness, he promised.

Photo Credit: A Soldier looks at the Army’s new website, “Not In My Squad Assessment Resource,” a tool designed to help improve squad leaders’ professional development and make good squads even greater. (U.S. Army photo by David Vergun)

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Mission Statement

The Mission Command Center of Excellence (MCCoE) develops, integrates and synchronizes Leader Development, Army Profession, and Mission Command requirements and solutions to prepare leaders and units to successfully exercise Mission Command during the execution of Unified Land Operations.

The MCCoE is fully committed to developing and delivering current and relevant Leader Development, Army Profession and Mission Command DOTMLPF (Doctrine-Organization-Training-Materiel-Leadership and education-Personnel-Facilities) solutions for the warfighter based on lessons learned from current operations and analysis of future operations.

The MCCoE was established in 2010 as the Army lead for implementing Mission Command across the force. The MCCoE was tasked to: determine MC WfF requirements; identify future MC capabilities; integrate MC across the DOTMLPF domains; and present resource-informed, outcomes-based MC and MC-related recommendations and solutions.

"Mission Command is the conduct of military operations through decentralized execution, using mission orders to enable disciplined initiative within the commander's intent. Done well, it empowers agile and adaptive leaders to successfully operate under conditions of uncertainty, exploit fleeting opportunities, and most importantly achieve unity of effort. Importantly, it helps establish mutual trust and shared understanding throughout the force. Mission Command is fundamental to ensuring that our Army stays ahead of and adapts to the rapidly changing environments we expect to face in the future."

- GEN Raymond T. Odierno, United States Army Chief of Staff,
5 May 14