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Handbook 06-08
May 2006

Appendix D

National Response Plan: Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex

Coordinating Agencies:

Cooperating Agencies:

Department of Defense

Department of Agriculture

Department of Energy

Department of Commerce

Department of Homeland Security

Department of Defense

Environmental Protection Agency

Department of Energy

National Aeronautics and
Space Administration

Department of Health and
Human Services

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Department of Homeland Security

 

Department of Housing and Urban Development

 

Department of the Interior

 

Department of Justice

 

Department of Labor

 

Department of State

 

Department of Transportation

 

Department of Veterans Affairs

 

Environmental Protection Agency

 

General Services Administration

 

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

 

American Red Cross

 

Introduction

Purpose

The Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex provides an organized and integrated capability for a timely, coordinated response by Federal agencies to terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radioactive materials (Incidents of National Significance), and accidents or incidents involving such material that may or may not rise to the level of an Incident of National Significance. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for overall coordination of all actual and potential Incidents of National Significance, including terrorist incidents involving nuclear materials.

This annex describes how the coordinating agencies and cooperating agencies support DHS’s overall coordination of the response to a nuclear/ radiological Incident of National Significance. In addition, this annex describes how the coordinating agencies lead the response to incidents of lesser severity. 1

The actions described in this annex may be implemented: (1) concurrently with, and as an integral part of, the National Response Plan (NRP) for all nuclear/radiological incidents or accidents considered to be Incidents of National Significance; or (2) independently for all other nuclear/ radiological accidents or incidents considered to be below the threshold of an Incident of National Significance and, therefore, not requiring overall Federal coordination by DHS.

1 Nuclear/radiological incidents of “lesser severity” are considered below the threshold of an Incident of National Significance, as determined by DHS, and vary from lost radiography sources or discovery of orphan radiological sources to incidents/emergencies at nuclear power plants below the classification of General Emergency, as defined by the cognizant regulatory agency (e.g., Department of Energy (DOE) or Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)).

Scope

This annex applies to nuclear/radiological incidents, including sabotage and terrorist incidents, involving the release or potential release of radioactive material that poses an actual or perceived hazard to public health, safety, national security, and/or the environment. This includes terrorist use of radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) or improvised nuclear devices (INDs) as well as reactor plant accidents (commercial or weapons production facilities), lost radioactive material sources, transportation accidents involving nuclear/ radioactive material, and foreign accidents involving nuclear or radioactive material.

The level of Federal response to a specific incident is based on numerous factors, including the ability of State, local, and tribal officials to respond; the type and/or amount of radioactive material involved; the extent of the impact or potential impact on the public and environment; and the size of the affected area.

In situations where threat analysis includes indications that a terrorist incident involving radiological materials could occur, actions are coordinated in accordance with the pre-incident prevention protocols set forth in the NRP Base Plan.

This annex:

  • Provides planning guidance and outlines operational concepts for the Federal response to any nuclear/radiological incident, including a terrorist incident, that has actual, potential, or perceived radiological consequences within the United States or its territories, possessions, or territorial waters, and that requires a response by the Federal Government. This includes both Incidents of National Significance and incidents of lesser severity;
  • Acknowledges the unique nature of a variety of nuclear/radiological incidents and the responsibilities of Federal, State, local, and tribal governments to respond to them;
  • Describes Federal policies and planning considerations on which this annex and Federal agency-specific nuclear/radiological response plans are based;
  • Specifies the roles and responsibilities of Federal agencies for preventing, preparing for, responding to, and recovering from nuclear/radiological incidents;
  • Includes guidelines for notification, coordination, and leadership of Federal activities, and coordination of public information, congressional relations, and international activities; and
  • Provides protocols for coordinating Federal Government capabilities to respond to radiological incidents. These capabilities include, but are not limited to:
  • The Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), which is responsible for production, coordination, and dissemination of consequence predictions for an airborne hazardous material release;
  • The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), established at or near the scene of an incident to coordinate radiological assessment and monitoring; and
  • The Advisory Team for Environment, Food, and Health (known as “the Advisory Team”), which provides expert recommendations on protective action guidance.

More information on these capabilities is included in subsequent sections of this annex.

Policies

DHS coordinates the overall Federal Government response to radiological Incidents of National Significance in accordance with Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5 and the NRP. In the NRP Base Plan, Figure 4, Structure for NRP Coordination: Terrorist Incident, illustrates the organizational framework that DHS utilizes to respond to terrorist incidents. In the NRP Base Plan, Figure 5, Structure for NRP Coordination: Federal-to-Federal Support, illustrates the organizational framework that DHS utilizes to respond to nonterrorist Incidents of National Significance.

  • The NRP supersedes the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, dated May 1, 1996.
  • The concept of operations described in this annex recognizes and addresses the unique challenges associated with and the need for specialized technical expertise/actions when responding to RDD/IND incidents with potentially catastrophic consequences.
  • DHS, as the overall incident manager for Incidents of National Significance, is supported by coordinating agencies and cooperating agencies. Coordinating agencies have specific nuclear/radiological technical expertise and assets for responding to the unique characteristics of these types of incidents. Coordinating agencies facilitate the nuclear/ radiological aspects of the response in support of DHS. For any given incident, the coordinating agency is the Federal agency that owns, has custody of, authorizes, regulates, or is otherwise designated responsibility for the nuclear/ radioactive material, facility, or activity involved in the incident. The coordinating agency is represented in the Joint Field Office (JFO) Coordination Group, the Interagency Incident Management Group (IIMG), and the Homeland Security Operations Center (HSOC). The coordinating agency is also represented in other response centers and entities, as appropriate for the specific incident.
  • Coordinating agencies are also responsible for leading the Federal response to nuclear/ radiological incidents of lesser severity (those incidents that do not reach the level of an Incident of National Significance).
  • Coordinating agencies may use the structure of the NRP to carry out their response duties, or any other structure consistent with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) capable of providing the required support to the affected State, local, or tribal government.
  • Cooperating agencies include other Federal agencies that provide technical and resource support to DHS and the coordinating agencies. These agencies are represented in the IIMG, the HSOC, and other response centers and entities, as appropriate for the specific incident. They may or may not be represented in the JFO Coordination Group.
  • DHS/Emergency Preparedness and Response/Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS/EPR/FEMA) is responsible for maintaining and updating this annex. DHS/EPR/FEMA accomplishes this responsibility through the Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC).
  • The Attorney General, generally acting through the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), has lead responsibility for criminal investigations of terrorist acts or terrorist threats and for coordinating activities of other members of the law enforcement community to detect, prevent, preempt, investigate, and disrupt terrorist attacks against the United States, including incidents involving nuclear/radioactive materials, in accordance with the following:
    • The Atomic Energy Act directs the FBI to investigate all alleged or suspected criminal violations of the act. Additionally, the FBI legally is responsible for locating any illegally diverted nuclear weapon, device, or material and for restoring nuclear facilities to their rightful custodians. In view of its unique responsibilities under the Atomic Energy Act (amended by the Energy Reorganization Act), the FBI has concluded formal agreements with the coordinating agencies that provide for interface, coordination, and technical support for the FBI’s law enforcement and criminal investigative efforts.
    • Generally, for nuclear facilities and materials in transit, the designated coordinating agency and cooperating agencies perform the functions delineated in this annex and provide technical support and assistance to the FBI in the performance of its law enforcement and criminal investigative mission. Those agencies supporting the FBI additionally coordinate and manage the technical portion of the response and activate/request assistance under this annex for measures to protect the public health and safety. In all cases, the FBI manages and directs the law enforcement and intelligence aspects of the response, while coordinating its activities with appropriate Federal, State, local, and tribal governments within the framework of this annex, and/or as provided for in established interagency agreements or plans. Further details regarding the FBI response are outlined in the Terrorism Incident Law Enforcement and Investigation Annex.
    • All Federal nuclear/radiological assistance capabilities outlined in this annex are available to support the Federal response to a terrorist threat, whether or not the threat develops into an actual incident.
  • When the concept of operations in this annex is implemented, existing interagency plans that address nuclear/radiological incident management are incorporated as supporting plans and/or operational supplements (e.g., the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP)).
  • This annex does not create any new authorities nor change any existing ones.
  • Nothing in this annex alters or impedes the ability of Federal departments and agencies to carry out their specific authorities and perform their responsibilities under law.
  • Some Federal agencies are authorized to respond directly to certain incidents affecting public health and safety. In these cases, procedures outlined in this annex may be used to coordinate the delivery of Federal resources to State, local, and tribal governments, and to coordinate assistance among Federal agencies for incidents that can be managed without the need for DHS coordination (i.e., incidents below the threshold of an Incident of National Significance).
  • The owner/operator of a nuclear/radiological facility primarily is responsible for mitigating the consequences of an incident, providing notification and appropriate protective action recommendations to State, local, and/or tribal government officials, and minimizing the radiological hazard to the public. The owner/operator has primary responsibility for actions within the facility boundary and may also have responsibilities for response and recovery activities outside the facility boundary under applicable legal obligations (e.g., contractual; licensee; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)).
  • State, local, and tribal governments primarily are responsible for determining and implementing measures to protect life, property, and the environment in those areas outside the facility boundary or incident location. This does not, however, relieve nuclear/radiological facility or material owners/operators from any applicable legal obligations.
  • State, local, and tribal governments and owners/operators of nuclear/radiological facilities or activities may request assistance directly from DHS, other Federal agencies, and/or State governments with which they have preexisting arrangements or relationships.
  • Response to nuclear/radiological incidents affecting land owned by the Federal Government is coordinated with the agency responsible for managing that land to ensure that incident management activities are consistent with Federal statutes governing use and occupancy. In the case of tribal lands, tribal governments have a special relationship with the U.S. Government, and Federal, State, and local governments may have limited or no authority on specific tribal reservations. Further guidance is provided in the Tribal Relations Support Annex.
  • Participating Federal agencies may take appropriate independent emergency actions within the limits of their own statutory authority to protect the public, mitigate immediate hazards, and gather information concerning the emergency to avoid delay.
  • Departments and agencies are not reimbursed for activities conducted under their own authorities unless other agreements or reimbursement mechanisms exist (e.g., Stafford Act, Federal-to-Federal assistance).
  • Federal coordination centers and agency teams provide their own logistical support consistent with agreed upon interagency execution plans. State, local, and tribal governments are encouraged to coordinate their efforts with the Federal effort, but maintain their own logistical support, consistent with applicable authorities and requirements.
  • For radiological incidents involving a nuclear weapon, special nuclear material, and/or classified components, the agency with custody of the material (the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of Energy (DOE), or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)) may establish a National Defense Area (NDA) or National Security Area (NSA). NDAs and NSAs are established to safeguard
  • classified information and/or restricted data, or equipment and material, and place non-Federal lands under Federal control for the duration of the incident. In the event radioactive contamination occurs, Federal officials coordinate with State and local officials to ensure appropriate public health and safety actions are taken outside the NDA or NSA.

Planning Assumptions

  • Radiological incidents may not be immediately recognized as such until the radioactive material is detected or the effects of radiation exposure are manifested in the population.
  • An act of radiological terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center within the United States, will have major consequences that can overwhelm the capabilities of many local, State, and/or tribal governments to respond and may seriously challenge existing Federal response capabilities.
  • A radiological incident may include chemical or biological contaminants, which may require concurrent implementation of the NCP or other Federal plans and procedures.
  • An incident involving the potential release of radioactivity may require implementation of protective measures.
  • An expeditious Federal response is required to mitigate the consequences of the nuclear/radiological incident. Radiological Incidents of National Significance that result in significant impacts likely will trigger implementation of the NRP Catastrophic Incident Annex and Catastrophic Incident Supplement.
  • The Federal Government response to radiological terrorist threats/incidents also includes the following assumptions:
    • If appropriate personal protective equipment and capabilities are not available and the area is contaminated by radioactive material, response actions in a contaminated area may be delayed until the material has dissipated to a safe level for emergency response personnel or until appropriate personal protective equipment and capabilities arrive, whichever is sooner;
    • The response to a radiological threat or actual incident requires an integrated Federal Government response;
    • In the case of a radiological terrorist attack, the effect may be temporarily and geographically dispersed, requiring response operations to be conducted over a multijurisdictional, multistate region; and
    • A radiological terrorist incident may affect a single location, or multiple locations, each of which may require an incident response and a crime scene investigation simultaneously.

Concept of Operations

General

This concept of operations is applicable to potential and actual radiological Incidents of National Significance requiring DHS coordination and other radiological incidents of lesser severity, utilizing the protocols delineated in this annex. For other radiological incidents of lesser severity, other Federal response plans (i.e., the NCP and/or agency-specific radiological incident response plans) may also be utilized, as appropriate.

Hazard-Specific Planning and Preparedness

Headquarters

  • The Federal Radiological Policy Coordinating Committee (FRPCC) provides a national-level forum for the development and coordination of radiological prevention and preparedness policies and procedures. It also provides policy guidance for Federal radiological incident management activities in support of State, local and tribal government radiological emergency planning and preparedness activities. The FRPCC is an interagency body consisting of the coordinating and cooperating agencies discussed in this annex, chaired by DHS/EPR/FEMA. The FRPCC establishes subcommittees, as necessary.
  • The FRPCC also coordinates research-study efforts of its member agencies related to State, local and tribal government radiological emergency preparedness to ensure minimum duplication and maximum benefits to State and local governments. The FRPCC coordinates planning and validating requirements of each agency, reviewing integration requirements and incorporating agency-specific plans, procedures, and equipment into the response system.

Regional: Regional Assistance Committees (RACs) in the DHS/EPR/FEMA regions serve as the primary coordinating structure at the Federal regional level. RAC membership mirrors that of the FRPCC, and RACs are chaired by a DHS/EPR/FEMA regional representative. Additionally, State emergency management agencies send representatives to RAC meetings and participate in regional exercise and training activities. The RACs provide a forum for information-sharing, consultation, and coordination of Federal regional awareness, prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery activities. The RACs also assist in providing technical assistance to State and local governments and evaluating radiological plans and exercises.

Coordinating Agencies and Cooperating Agencies

During a response to an Incident of National Significance, coordinating agencies and cooperating agencies provide technical expertise, specialized equipment, and personnel in support of DHS, which is responsible for overall coordination of incident management activities. Coordinating agencies have primary responsibilities for Federal activities related to the nuclear/radiological aspects of the incident.

The coordinating agency is that Federal agency which owns, has custody of, authorizes, regulates, or is otherwise deemed responsible for the radiological facility or activity involved in the incident. The following paragraphs identify the coordinating agency for a variety of radiological incidents. For example, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is the coordinating agency for incidents involving nuclear facilities licensed by the NRC; DOE is the coordinating agency for incidents involving the transportation of radioactive materials shipped by or for DOE. Table 1 identifies the coordinating agency for a variety of radiological incidents.

Radiological Terrorism Incidents:

  • The coordinating agency provides technical support to DHS, which has overall responsibility for domestic incident management, and to the FBI, which has the lead responsibility for criminal investigations of terrorist acts or terrorist threats. The FBI also is responsible for coordinating activities of other members of the law enforcement community to detect, prevent, preempt, investigate, and disrupt terrorist attacks against the United States, including incidents involving nuclear/radioactive materials (e.g. RDD/IND incidents).
  • TABLE 1. Coordinating agencies

    Note: DHS is responsible for the overall coordination of incident management activities for all nuclear or radiological Incidents of National Significance, including those involving terrorism.

    Type of Incident

    Coordinating Agency

    a.Radiological terrorism incidents (e.g., RDD/IND or radiological exposure device):
    (1) Material or facilities owned or operated by DOD or DOE
    (2) Material or facilities licensed by NRC or Agreement State
    (3) All others

    (1) DOD or DOE
    (2) NRC
    (3) DOE

    b. Nuclear facilities:
    (1) Owned or operated by DOD or DOE
    (2) Licensed by NRC or Agreement State
    (3) Not licensed, owned, or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement State, or currently or formerly licensed facilities for which the owner/operator is not financially viable or is otherwise unable to respond

    (1) DOD or DOE
    (2) NRC
    (3) EPA

    c. Transportation of radioactive materials: (1) Materials shipped by or for DOD or DOE
    (2) Shipment of NRC or Agreement State-licensed materials
    (3) Shipment of materials in certain areas of the coastal zone that are not licensed or owned by a Federal agency or Agreement State (see USCG list of responsibilities for further explanation of “certain areas”)
    (4) All others

    (1) DOD or DOE
    (2) NRC
    (3) DHS/USCG
    (4) EPA

    Type of Incident

    Coordinating Agency

    d. Space vehicles containing radioactive materials:
    (1) Managed by NASA or DOD (2) Not managed by DOD or NASA impacting certain areas of the coastal zone
    (3) All others

    (1) NASA or DOD
    (2) DHS/USCG
    (3) EPA

    e. Foreign, unknown or unlicensed material:
    (1) Incidents involving foreign or unknown sources of radioactive material in certain areas of the coastal zone
    (2) All others

    (1) DHS/USCG
    (2) EPA

    f. Nuclear weapon accident/incident (based on custody at time of event)

    DOD or DOE

    Other types of incidents not otherwise addressed above DHS designates

    DHS designates

  • For radiological terrorism incidents involving materials or facilities owned or operated by DOD or DOE, DOD or DOE is the coordinating agency, as appropriate.
  • For radiological terrorism incidents involving materials or facilities licensed by the NRC or Agreement States, the NRC is the coordinating agency.
  • For all other radiological terrorist incidents, DOE is the coordinating agency. The coordinating agency role transitions from DOE to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for environmental cleanup and site restoration at a mutually agreeable time, and after consultation with State, local, and tribal governments, the cooperating agencies, and the JFO Coordination Group.

Nuclear Facilities:

  • The NRC is the coordinating agency for incidents that occur at fixed facilities or activities licensed by the NRC or an Agreement State. These include, but are not limited to, commercial nuclear power plants, fuel cycle facilities, DOE-owned gaseous diffusion facilities operating under NRC regulatory oversight, independent spent fuel storage installations, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers, and research reactors.
  • DOD or DOE is the coordinating agency for incidents that occur at facilities or vessels under their jurisdiction, custody, or control. These incidents may involve reactor operations, nuclear material, weapons production, radioactive material from nuclear weapons or munitions, or other radiological activities.
  • EPA is the coordinating agency for incidents that occur at facilities not licensed, owned, or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement State, or currently or formerly licensed facilities for which the owner/operator is not financially viable or is otherwise unable to respond.

Transportation of Radioactive Materials:

  • Either DOD or DOE is the coordinating agency for transportation incidents involving DOD or DOE materials, depending on which of these agencies has custody of the material at the time of the incident.
  • The NRC is the coordinating agency for transportation incidents that involve radiological material licensed by the NRC or an Agreement State.
  • DHS/U.S. Coast Guard (DHS/USCG) is the coordinating agency for the shipment of materials in certain areas of the coastal zone that are not licensed or owned by a Federal agency or Agreement State.
  • EPA is the coordinating agency for shipment of materials in other areas of the coastal zone and in the inland zone that are not licensed or owned by a Federal agency or an Agreement State.

Space Vehicles Containing Radioactive Materials:

  • NASA is the coordinating agency for missions involving NASA space vehicles or joint space vehicles with significant NASA involvement. DOD is the coordinating agency for missions involving DOD space vehicles or joint space vehicles with significant DOD involvement. A joint venture is an activity in which the U.S. Government has provided extensive design/financial input; has provided and maintains ownership of instruments, spacecraft, or the launch vehicle; or is intimately involved in mission operations. A joint venture is not created by simply selling or supplying material to a foreign country for use in its spacecraft.
  • DHS/USCG is the coordinating agency for space vehicles not managed by DOD or NASA impacting certain areas of the coastal zone.
  • EPA is the coordinating agency for all other space vehicle incidents involving radioactive material.

Foreign, Unknown, or Unlicensed Material: EPA or DHS/USCG is the coordinating agency depending on the location of the incident. DHS/USCG is the coordinating agency for incidents involving foreign or unknown sources of radioactive material in certain areas of the coastal zone. EPA is the coordinating agency for all other incidents involving foreign, unknown, or unlicensed radiological sources that have actual, potential, or perceived radiological consequences in the United States or its territories, possessions, or territorial waters. The foreign or unlicensed source may be a reactor, a spacecraft containing radioactive material, imported radioactively contaminated material, or a shipment of foreign-owned radioactive material. Unknown sources of radioactive material, also termed “orphan sources,” are those materials whose origin and/or radiological nature are not yet established. These types of sources include contaminated scrap metal or abandoned radioactive material.

Other Types of Incidents: For other types of incidents not covered above, DHS, in consultation with the other coordinating agencies, designates a coordinating agency. If DHS determines that it is an Incident of National Significance, DHS is responsible for overall coordination and the designated coordinating agency assumes responsibilities as the coordinating agency.

Notification Procedures

  • The owner/operator of a nuclear/radiological facility or owner/transporter of nuclear/ radiological material is generally the first to become aware of an incident and notifies State, local and tribal authorities and the coordinating agency.
  • Federal, State, local, and tribal governments that become aware of a radiological incident from any source other than the coordinating agency notify the HSOC and the coordinating agency.
  • The coordinating agency provides notification of a radiological incident to the HSOC and other coordinating agencies, as appropriate.
  • Releases of hazardous materials that are regulated under the NCP (40 CFR part 302) are reported to the National Response Center.

Incident Actions

Headquarters: Incidents of National Significance

  • Coordinating agencies and cooperating agencies report information and intelligence relative to situational awareness and incident management to the HSOC. Agencies with radiological response functions provide representatives to the HSOC, as requested.
  • The coordinating agency and cooperating agencies, as appropriate, provide representation to the IIMG.
  • Coordinating agencies and cooperating agencies provide representation to the National Response Coordination Center (NRCC), as appropriate.

Other Radiological Incidents

  • For radiological incidents that are below the threshold of an Incident of National Significance but require Federal participation in the response, the coordinating agency coordinates the Federal response utilizing the procedures in this annex, agency-specific plans, and/or the NCP, as appropriate. The coordinating agency provides intelligence and information relative to the incident to the HSOC.
  • The NRCC may be utilized to provide interagency coordination and Federal resource tracking, if needed.

Regional: Incidents of National Significance

  • The coordinating agency provides representation to the JFO to serve as a Senior Federal Official within the JFO Coordination Group. Cooperating agencies may also be represented, as needed.
  • The coordinating agency is part of the Unified Command, as defined by the NIMS, and coordinates Federal radiological response activities at appropriate field facilities.2

2 Appropriate field facilities may include a JFO, Incident Command Post, Emergency Operations Center, Emergency Operations Facility, Emergency Control Center, etc.

Other Radiological Incidents: The coordinating Response Functions: Primary radiological agency coordinates Federal response operations at a response functions are addressed in this section. An designated field facility. Cooperating agencies may overview of specific DHS and coordinating agency also be represented, as needed. response functions is provided in Table 2.

TABLE 2: DHS and coordinating agency response functions overview

Response Function

Incidents of National Significance

Other Radiological Incidents

a. Coordinate actions of Federal agencies related to the overall response.

DHS

Coordinating agency

b. Coordinate Federal activities related to response and recovery of the radiological aspects of an incident.

DHS and coordinating agency

Coordinating agency

c. Coordinate incident security.

DHS and coordinating agency

Coordinating agency

d. Ensure coordination of technical data (collection, analysis, storage, and dissemination).

DHS and coordinating agency

Coordinating agency

e. Ensure Federal protective action recommendations are developed and provide advice and assistance to State, local, and tribal governments.

DHS and coordinating agency

Coordinating agency

Response Function

Incidents of National Significance

Other Radiological Incidents

f. Coordinate release of Federal information to the public.

DHS

Coordinating agency

g. Coordinate release of Federal information to Congress.

DHS

Coordinating agency

h. Keep the White House informed on all aspects of an incident.

DHS

Coordinating agency

i. Ensure coordination of demobilization of Federal assets.

DHS

Coordinating agency

Response Coordination

Federal Agency Coordination

Incidents of National Significance

DHS is responsible for the overall coordination of Incidents of National Significance using elements described in the NRP Base Plan concept of operations.

Other Radiological Incidents

  • The agency with primary responsibility for coordinating the Federal response to a radiological incident serves as the coordinating agency.
  • The coordinating agency coordinates the actions of Federal agencies related to the incident utilizing this annex, agency-specific plans, and/or the NCP, as appropriate.
  • Cooperating agencies provide technical and resource support, as requested by the coordinating agency.
  • The coordinating agency may establish a field facility; assist State, local, and tribal response organizations; monitor and support owner/operator activities (when there is an owner or operator); provide technical support to the owner/operator, if requested; and serve as the principal Federal source of information about incident conditions.

Coordinating Radiological Aspects of an Incident

Incidents of National Significance

  • DHS and the coordinating agency coordinate Federal activities related to responding to and recovering from the radiological aspects of an incident. They are assisted by cooperating agencies, as requested.
  • The coordinating agency provides a hazard assessment of conditions that might have significant impact and ensures that measures are taken to mitigate the potential consequences.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency coordinates Federal activities related to response and recovery of the radiological aspects of an incident, assisted by cooperating agencies, as requested.

Incident Security Coordination

Incidents of National Significance

DHS and the coordinating agency are responsible for coordinating security activities related to Federal response operations.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency coordinates security activities related to Federal response operations.

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

  • DOD, DOE, or NASA, as the appropriate coordinating agency, may establish NDAs or NSAs to safeguard classified information and/or restricted data, or equipment and material, and place non-Federal lands under Federal control for the duration of the incident. DOD, DOE, or NASA, as appropriate, coordinates security in and around these locations, as necessary.
  • For incidents at other Federal or private facilities, the owner/operator provides security within the facility boundaries. If a release of radioactive material occurs beyond the facility boundaries, State, local, or tribal governments provide security for the release area.
  • State, local, and tribal governments provide security for radiological incidents occurring on public lands (e.g., a transportation incident).
  • If needed, ESF #13 – Public Safety and Security may be activated to provide supplemental security resources and capabilities

Technical Data Management

Incidents of National Significance

  • DHS and the coordinating agency approve the release of all data to State, local, and tribal governments.
  • For incidents involving terrorism, the coordinating agency consults with other members of the JFO Coordination Group as issues arise regarding the sharing of sensitive information that may be needed, on a need-to-know basis, for responder and public safety.
  • DHS and the coordinating agency, in consultation with the JFO Coordination Group and State, local, and tribal governments, determine if the severity of an incident warrants a request for Nuclear Incident Response Team (NIRT) assets.
  • The IMAAC is responsible for production, coordination, and dissemination of consequence predictions for an airborne hazardous material release. The IMAAC generates the single Federal prediction of atmospheric dispersions and their consequences utilizing the best available resources from the Federal Government.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency authorizes the release of all data to State, local, and tribal governments.

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

  • The coordinating agency oversees the collection, analysis, storage, and dissemination of all technical data through the entire process.
  • The coordinating agency is responsible for ensuring the sharing of all technical data, including outputs from the FRMAC, the Advisory Team, and the IMAAC, with all appropriate response organizations.
  • Federal monitoring and assessment activities are coordinated with State, local, and tribal governments. Federal agency plans and procedures for implementing this activity are designed to be compatible with the radiological emergency planning requirements for State and local governments, specific facilities, and existing memorandums of understanding and interagency agreements.
  • Prior to the on-scene arrival of the coordinating agency, Federal first responders may provide radiological monitoring and assessment data to State, local, and tribal governments as requested in support of protective action decision making. Federal first responders also begin collecting data for transmission to the coordinating agency. If a FRMAC is established, the coordinating agency provides a mechanism for transmitting data to and from the FRMAC. Prior to the initiation of FRMAC operations, Federal first responders coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment data with the DOE ConsequenceManagement Home Team (CMHT) or the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT). (Note: A CMHT provides a reach-back capability to support the CMRT. The CMRT functions as an advance element of the FRMAC to establish contact with on-scene responders to coordinate Federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities.)
  • DOE and other participating Federal agencies learn of an emergency when they are alerted to a possible problem or receive a request for radiological assistance. DOE maintains national and regional coordination offices as points of access to Federal radiological emergency assistance. Requests for Radiological Assessment Program (RAP) teams are generally directed to the appropriate DOE Regional Coordinating Office. All other requests for Federal radiological monitoring and assessment go directly to DOE’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, DC. When other agencies receive requests for Federal radiological monitoring and assessment assistance, they notify the DOE EOC.
  • DOE may respond to a State or coordinating agency request for assistance by dispatching a RAP team. If the situation requires more assistance than a RAP team can provide, DOE alerts or activates additional resources. These resources can include the establishment of a FRMAC as the coordination center for Federal radiological assessment activities. DOE may respond with additional resources including the Aerial Measurement System (AMS) to provide wide-area radiation monitoring, Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) medical advisory teams, National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) support, or if the accident involves a U.S. nuclear weapon, the Accident Response Group (ARG). Federal and State agencies are encouraged to collocate their radiological assessment activities. Some participating Federal agencies have radiological planning and emergency responsibilities as part of their statutory authority, as well as established working relationships with State counterpart agencies. The monitoring and assessment activity, coordinated by DOE, does not alter these responsibilities but complements them by providing for coordination of the initial Federal radiological monitoring and assessment response activity.
  • Responsibility for coordinating radiological monitoring and assessment activities may transition to EPA at a mutually agreeable time, and after consultation with State, local, and tribal governments, the coordinating agency, and the JFO Coordination Group.

Protective Action Recommendations

Incidents of National Significance

DHS and the coordinating agency oversee the development of Federal Protective Action Recommendations and provide advice and assistance to State, tribal, and local governments. Federal Protective Action Recommendations are developed by the Advisory Team, in conjunction with the coordinating agency. Federal Protective Action Recommendations may include advice and assistance on measures to avoid or reduce exposure of the public to radiation from a release of radioactive material. This includes advice on emergency actions such as sheltering, evacuation, and prophylactic use of potassium iodide. It also includes advice on long-term measures, such as restriction of food, temporary relocation, or permanent resettlement, to avoid or minimize exposure to residual radiation or exposure through the ingestion pathway.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency, in consultation with the Advisory Team, develops and provides Protective Action Recommendations.

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

State, local, and tribal governments are responsible for implementing protective actions as they deem appropriate.

Public Information Coordination

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

DHS, in consultation with other agencies and the JFO Coordination Group oversees and manages the establishment of a Joint Information Center (JIC), if required.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency may establish a JIC depending on the needs of the incident response.

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

  • Owners/operators and Federal, State, local, tribal, and other relevant information sources coordinate public information to the extent practical with the JIC. Communication with the public is accomplished in accordance with procedures outlined in the ESF #15 – External Affairs Annex and the Public Affairs Support Annex.
  • It may be necessary to release Federal information regarding public health and safety. In this instance, Federal agencies coordinate with the coordinating agency and State, local, and tribal governments in advance, or as soon as possible after the information is released.

Congressional Coordination

Incidents of National Significance

DHS coordinates Federal responses to congressional requests for information. Points of contact for this function are the congressional liaison officers. All Federal agency congressional liaison officers and congressional staffs seeking site-specific information about an incident should contact the DHS Office of Legislative Affairs and the coordinating agency. While Congress may request information directly from any Federal agency, any agency responding to such requests shall inform DHS and the coordinating agency.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency is responsible for congressional coordination, consulting with DHS as required.

White House Coordination

Incidents of National Significance

DHS submits reports to the President and keeps the White House informed of all aspects of the incident. While the White House may request information directly from any Federal agency, any agency responding to such requests must promptly inform DHS and the coordinating agency.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency is responsible for any necessary White House coordination, consulting with DHS as requested. Note that these actions can take place during the transition from response to recovery.

Deactivation/Demobilization Coordination

Incidents of National Significance

DHS and the coordinating agency, in consultation with the JFO Coordination Group and State, local, and tribal governments, develop plans to demobilize the Federal presence.

Other Radiological Incidents

The coordinating agency discontinues incident operations when a centralized Federal coordination presence is no longer required, or when its statutory responsibilities are fulfilled. Prior to discontinuing operations, the coordinating agency coordinates this decision with each Federal agency and State, local, and tribal governments.

International Coordination

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

  • In the event of an actual or potential environmental impact upon the United States or its possessions, territories, or territorial waters from a radiological emergency originating on foreign soil or, conversely, a domestic incident with an actual or potential foreign impact, DHS and the coordinating agency immediately inform the Department of State (DOS), which is responsible for official interactions with foreign governments. In either case (foreign incident with domestic impact, or vice versa), the coordinating agency consults with DHS, and DHS makes a determination on whether it is an Incident of National Significance. DHS and the coordinating agency keep DOS informed of all Federal incident management activities.
  • DOS coordinates notification and information-gathering activities with foreign governments, except in cases where existing bilateral agreements permit direct communication. Where the coordinating agency has existing bilateral agreements that permit direct exchange of information, the coordinating agency keeps DOS informed of consultations with their foreign counterparts. DHS and the coordinating agency ensure that any offers of assistance to, or requests from, foreign governments are coordinated with DOS.
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is the point of interaction with the hydrometeorological services of other countries. International response activities are accomplished in accordance with the International Coordination Support Annex.

Victim Decontamination/Population Monitoring

Incidents of National Significance and Other Radiological Incidents

  • External monitoring and decontamination of possibly affected victims are accomplished locally and are the responsibility of State, local, and tribal governments. Federal resources are provided at the request of, and in support of, the affected State(s). HHS, through ESF #8 and in consultation with the coordinating agency, coordinates Federal support for external monitoring of people and decontamination.
  • HHS assists and supports State, local, and tribal governments in performing monitoring for internal contamination and administering available pharmaceuticals for internal decontamination, as deemed necessary by State health officials.
  • HHS assists local and State health departments in establishing a registry of potentially exposed individuals, perform dose reconstruction, and conduct long-term monitoring of this population for potential long-term health effects.

Other Federal Resource Support

For Stafford Act or Federal-to-Federal support incidents, DHS/EPR/FEMA coordinates the provision of Federal resources and assistance to affected State, local, and tribal governments as part of the JFO Operations Section or other appropriate location established by DHS/EPR/FEMA.

Recovery

  • For an Incident of National Significance, DHS coordinates overall Federal recovery activities, while the coordinating agency maintains responsibility for managing the Federal technical radiological cleanup activities in accordance with NRP mechanisms.
  • For all radiological incidents, the coordinating agency coordinates environmental remediation/cleanup in concert with cognizant State, local, and tribal governments, and owners/operators, as applicable. While retaining overall technical lead, a coordinating agency may require support from a cooperating agency that has significant cleanup/recovery experience and capabilities (e.g., EPA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)) for a long-term cleanup. The initial coordinating agency may request that the coordinating agency role be transitioned to a cooperating agency to manage long-term cleanup efforts.
  • State, local, and tribal governments primarily are responsible for planning the recovery of the affected area (the term “recovery,” as used here, encompasses any action dedicated to the continued protection of the public and resumption of normal activities in the affected area). Recovery planning is initiated at the request of the State, local, or tribal governments, and generally does not take place until the initiating conditions of the incident have stabilized and immediate actions to protect public health, safety, and property are accomplished. Upon request, the Federal government assists State, local, and tribal governments develop and execute recovery plans.
  • Private owners/operators have primary responsibility for recovery planning activities and eventual cleanup within their facility boundaries and may have responsibilities for recovery activities outside their facility under applicable legal obligations (e.g., contractual, licensee, CERCLA).
  • The DOE FRMAC Director works closely with the Senior EPA representative to facilitate a smooth transition of the Federal radiological monitoring and assessment coordination responsibility to EPA at a mutually agreeable time, and after consultation with DHS, the JFO Coordination Group, and State, local, and tribal governments. The following conditions are intended to be met prior to transfer:
  • The immediate emergency condition is stabilized;
  • Offsite releases of radioactive material have ceased, and there is little or no potential for further unintentional offsite releases;
  • The offsite radiological conditions are characterized and the immediate consequences are assessed;
  • An initial long-range monitoring plan has been developed in conjunction with the affected State, local, and tribal governments and appropriate Federal agencies; and
  • EPA has received adequate assurances from the other Federal agencies that they are committing the required resources, personnel, and funds for the duration of the Federal response.
  • Radiological monitoring and assessment activities are normally terminated when DHS, in consultation with the coordinating agency, other participating agencies, and State, local, and tribal governments, determines that:
  • There is no longer a threat to public health and safety or the environment;
  • State, local, and tribal resources are adequate for the situation; and
  • There is mutual agreement among the agencies involved to terminate monitoring and assessment.

Federal Assets Available Upon Request by the Coordinating Agency or DHS

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

DOE is responsible for developing and maintaining FRMAC policies and procedures, determining FRMAC composition, and maintaining FRMAC operational readiness. The FRMAC is established at or near the incident location in coordination with DHS, the coordinating agency, other Federal agencies, and State, local, and tribal authorities. A FRMAC normally includes representation from DOE, EPA, the Department of Commerce, the National Communications System (DHS/IAIP/NCS), USACE, and other Federal agencies as needed. Regardless of who is designated as the coordinating agency, DOE, through the FRMAC or DOE CMHT and CMRT, coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the response. When the FRMAC is transferred to the EPA, they assume responsibility for coordination of radiological monitoring and assessment activities.

Advisory Team for Environment, Food, and Health

  • The Advisory Team includes representatives from DHS, EPA, the Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other Federal agencies. The Advisory Team develops coordinated advice and recommendations for DHS, the JFO Coordination Group, the coordinating agency, and State, local, and tribal governments concerning environmental, food health, and animal health matters.
  • The Advisory Team selects a chair for the Team.
  • The Advisory Team provides recommendations in matters related to the following:
  • Environmental assessments (field monitoring) required for developing recommendations with advice from State, local, and tribal governments and/or the FRMAC senior Monitoring Manager;
  • Protective Action Guides and their application to the emergency;
  • Protective Action Recommendations using data and assessment from the FRMAC;
  • Protective actions to prevent or minimize contamination of milk, food, and water, and to prevent or minimize exposure through ingestion;
  • Recommendations regarding the disposition of contaminated livestock, poultry, and contaminated foods, especially perishable commodities (e.g., meat in processing plants);
  • Recommendations for minimizing losses of agricultural resources from radiation effects;
  • Availability of food, animal feed, and water supply inspection programs to assure wholesomeness;
  • Relocation, reentry, and other radiation protection measures prior to recovery;
  • Recommendations for recovery, return, and cleanup issues;
  • Health and safety advice or information for the public and for workers;
  • Estimated effects of radioactive releases on human health and the environment; and
  • Other matters, as requested by the coordinating agency.


DOE Radiological Assistance Program, Emergency Management Teams, and Nuclear Incident Response Team Assets

  • RAP teams are located at DOE operations offices, national laboratories, and some area offices. They can be dispatched to a radiological incident by the DOE regional coordinating offices responding to a radiological incident.

Additional DOE planning and response teams and capabilities are located at various DOE facilities throughout the country and can be dispatched, as needed, to a radiological incident.

Responsibilities

American Red Cross

(See the ESF #6 – Mass Care, Housing, and Human Services Annex for additional information.) Assesses the mass care consequences of a radiological incident, and in conjunction with State, local, and tribal (including private-sector) mass care organizations, develop and implement a sustainable short-term and long-term strategy for effectively addressing the consequences of the incident.

Department of Agriculture

(See the ESF #11 – Agriculture and Natural Resources Annex for additional information.)

  • Inspects meat and meat products, poultry and poultry products, and egg products identified for interstate and foreign commerce to ensure that they are safe for human consumption.
  • Assists, in conjunction with HHS, in monitoring the production, processing, storage, and distribution of food through the wholesale level to eliminate contaminated product or to reduce the contamination in the product to a safe level.
  • Collects agricultural samples within the Ingestion Exposure Pathway Emergency Planning Zone (through the FRMAC). Assists in the evaluation and assessment of data to determine the impact of the incident on agriculture.
  • Assesses damage to crops, soil, livestock, poultry, and processing facilities and incorporates findings in a damage assessment report.
  • Provides emergency communications assistance to the agricultural community through the State Research, Education, and Extension Services electronic mail, or other USDA telecommunications systems.
  • Supports/advises on decontamination and screening of pets and farm animals that may be exposed to radioactive material.
  • Assists in animal carcass disposal.

Department of Commerce

  • Provides operational weather observations and prepares forecasts tailored to support emergency incident management activities.
  • Provides plume dispersion assessment and forecasts to the IMAAC and/or coordinating agency, in accordance with established procedures.
  • Archives, as a special collection, the meteorological data from national observing and numerical weather analysis and prediction systems applicable to the monitoring and assessment of the response.
  • Ensures that marine fishery products available to the public are not contaminated.
  • Provides assistance and reference material for calibrating radiological instruments.
  • Provides radiation shielding materials.
  • In the event of materials potentially crossing international boundaries, serves as the agent for informing international hydrometeorological services and associated agencies through the mechanisms afforded by the World Meteorological Organization.
  • Provides radioanalytical measurement support and instrumentation.

Department of Defense

  • Serves as a coordinating agency, as identified in Table 1, coordinating Federal actions for radiological incidents involving DOD facilities, including U.S. nuclear-powered ships, or material otherwise under their jurisdiction (e.g., transportation of material shipped by or for DOD).
  • Provides Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) in response to requests for assistance during domestic incidents. With the exception for support provided under Immediate Response Authority, the obligation of DOD resources to support requests for assistance is subject to the approval of the Secretary of Defense. Details regarding DSCA are provided in the NRP Base Plan.
  • Provides Immediate Response Authority under imminently serious conditions resulting from any civil emergency that may require immediate action to save lives, prevent human suffering, or mitigate great property damage. When such conditions exist and time does not permit prior approval from higher headquarters, local military commanders and responsible officials from DOD components and agencies are authorized by DOD directive, subject to any supplemental direction that may be provided by their DOD component, to take necessary action to respond to requests of civil authorities. All such necessary action is referred to as “Immediate Response.”

Department of Defense/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

(See the ESF #3 – Public Works and Engineering Annex for additional information.)

  • Directs response/recovery actions as they relate to ESF #3 functions, including contaminated debris management.
  • For RDD/IND incidents, provides response and cleanup support as a cooperating agency.
  • Integrates and coordinates with other agencies, as requested, to perform any or all of the following:
  • Radiological survey functions;
  • Gross decontamination;
  • Site characterization;
  • Contaminated water management; and
  • Site remediation.

Department of Energy

  • Serves as a coordinating agency, as identified in Table 1, coordinating Federal actions for radiological incidents involving DOE facilities or material otherwise under their jurisdiction (e.g., transportation of material shipped by or for DOE).
  • Coordinates Federal offsite radiological environmental monitoring and assessment activities as lead technical organization in FRMAC (emergency phase), regardless of who is designated the coordinating agency.
  • Maintains technical liaison with State and local agencies with monitoring and assessment responsibilities.
  • Maintains a common set of all offsite radiological monitoring data in an accountable, secure, and retrievable form and ensures the technical integrity of FRMAC data.
  • Provides monitoring data and interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any other requested radiological assessments, to the coordinating agency and to the States.
  • Provides, in cooperation with other Federal agencies, the personnel and equipment to perform radiological monitoring and assessment activities, and provides on-scene analytical capability supporting assessments.
  • Requests supplemental assistance and technical support from other Federal agencies as needed.
  • Arranges consultation and support services through appropriate Federal agencies to all other entities (e.g., private contractors) with radiological monitoring functions and capabilities and technical and medical expertise for handling radiological contamination and population monitoring.
  • Works closely with the Senior EPA representative to facilitate a smooth transition of the Federal radiological monitoring and assessment coordination responsibility to EPA at a mutually agreeable time and after consultation with the States and coordinating agency.
  • Provides, in cooperation with other Federal and State agencies, personnel and equipment, including portal monitors, to support initial external screening and provides advice and assistance to State and local personnel conducting screening/decontamination of persons leaving a contaminated zone.
  • Provides plume trajectories and deposition projections for emergency response planning assessments including source term estimates where limited or no information is available, including INDs and RDDs, to the IMAAC and/or coordinating agency, in accordance with established procedures.
  • Upgrades, maintains, coordinates, and publishes documentation needed for the administration, implementation, operation, and standardization of the FRMAC.
  • Maintains and improves the ability to provide wide-area radiation monitoring now resident in the AMS.
  • Maintains and improves the ability to provide medical assistance, advisory teams, and training related to nuclear/radiological accidents and incidents now resident in the REAC/TS.
  • Maintains and improves the ability to provide near-real time assessments of the consequences of accidental or potential radiation releases by modeling the movement of hazardous plumes, and to correct modeled results through integration of actual radiation measurements obtained from both airborne and ground sources, resident in the NARAC. The NARAC also maintains and improves their ability to model the direct results (blast, thermal, radiation, EMP) of a nuclear detonation.
  • Maintains and improves the first-response ability to assess an emergency situation and to advise decision makers on what further steps can be taken to evaluate and minimize the hazards of a radiological emergency resident in the RAP.
  • Maintains and improves the ability to respond to an emergency involving U.S. nuclear weapons resident in the ARG.
  • Maintains and improves the ability of the Consequence Management Planning Team, CMHT, and CMRTs to provide initial planning, coordination, and data collection and assessment prior to or in lieu of establishment of a FRMAC.
  • Maintains and improves the ability of the Nuclear/Radiological Advisory Team to provide advice and limited technical assistance, including search, diagnostics, and effects prediction, as part of a Domestic Emergency Support Team.
  • Maintains and improves the ability of the Search Response Teams to provide covert search capability using local support for initial nuclear search activities.
  • Maintains and improves the ability of the Joint Technical Operations Team to provide technical operations advisory support and advanced technical assistance to the Federal primary or coordinating agency, provide extended technical support to other deployed operations through an emergency response home team; perform nuclear safety reviews to determine safe-to-ship status before moving a weapon of mass destruction (WMD) to an appropriate disposal location; and accept custody of nuclear or radiological WMD on behalf of DOE and provide for the final disposition of these devices.
  • Maintains and improves the ability of Radiological Triage to determine through remote analysis of nuclear spectra collected on-scene if a radioactive object contains special nuclear materials.
  • Assigns a Senior Energy Official (SEO) for any response involving the deployment of the DOE/NNSA emergency response assets. The SEO is responsible for the coordination and employment of these assets at the scene of a radiological event, and the deployed assets will work in support of and under the direction of the SEO.

Department of Health and Human Services

(See the ESF #8 – Public Health and Medical Services Annex for additional information.)

  • In conjunction with USDA, inspects production, processing, storage, and distribution facilities for human food and animal feeds that may be used in interstate commerce to ensure protection of the public health.
  • Collects samples of agricultural products to monitor and assess the extent of contamination as a basis for recommending or implementing protective actions (through the FRMAC).
  • Provides advice on proper medical treatment of the general population and response workers exposed to or contaminated by radioactive materials.
  • Provides available medical countermeasures through deployment of the Strategic National Stockpile.
  • Provides assessment and treatment teams for those exposed to or contaminated by radiation.
  • Provides advice and guidance in assessing the impact of the effects of radiological incidents on the health of persons in the affected area.
  • Manages long-term public monitoring and supports follow-on personal data collection, collecting and processing of blood samples and bodily fluids/matter samples, and advice concerning medical assessment and triage of victims. Tracks victim treatment and long-term health effects.

Department of Homeland Security/Emergency Preparedness and Response/Federal Emergency Management Agency

  • Serves as the annex coordinator for this annex.
  • In consultation with the coordinating agency, coordinates the provision of Federal resources and assistance to affected State, local, and tribal governments under the Stafford Act or Federal-to-Federal support provisions of the NRP.
  • Monitors the status of the Federal response to requests for assistance from the affected State(s) and provides this information to the State(s).
  • Keeps the coordinating agency informed of requests for assistance from the State(s) and the status of the Federal response.
  • Identifies and informs Federal agencies of actual or apparent omissions, redundancies, or conflicts in response activity.
  • Establishes and maintains a source of integrated, coordinated information about the status of all nonradiological resource support activities.
  • Provides other support to Federal agencies responding to the emergency.

Department of Homeland Security/National Communications System

(See the ESF #2 – Communications Annex for additional information.)

Acting through its operational element, the National Coordinating Center for Telecommunications (NCC), the NCS ensures the provision of adequate telecommunications support to Federal radiological incident response operations.

Department of Homeland Security/Science and Technology

(See the Science and Technology Support Annex for additional information.)

Provides coordination of Federal science and technology resources as described in the Science and Technology Support Annex. This includes organization of Federal S&T support as well as assessment and consultation in the form of Scientific and Technical Advisory and Response Teams (STARTs) and the IMAAC.

Department of Homeland Security/Customs and Border Protection (DHS/CBP)

  • For incidents at the border, maintains radiation detection equipment and nonintrusive inspection technology at ports of entry/Border Patrol checkpoints and to detect the presence of radiological substances transported by persons, cargo, mail, or conveyance arriving from foreign countries.
  • Through its National Targeting Center, provides extensive analytical and targeting capabilities to identify and interdict terrorists and WMD.
  • The CBP Weapons of Mass Destruction Teleforensic Center provides 24/7 support to DHS/CBP and other Federal law enforcement personnel in the identification of suspect hazardous material.
  • The CBP Laboratory and Scientific Services staffs WMD Response Teams in strategic locations nationwide.
  • Through the Container Security Initiative, DHS/CBP personnel are stationed at major foreign seaports in order to detect and prevent the transport of WMD on container vessels destined to the U.S.
  • Has extensive authority and expertise regarding the entry, inspection, and admissibility of persons, cargo, mail, and conveyances arriving from foreign countries.

Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Coast Guard

  • Serves as coordinating agency for incidents that occur in certain areas of the coastal zone, as identified in Table 1.
  • “Certain areas of the coastal zone,” for the purposes of this document, means the following areas of the coastal zone as defined by the NCP:
  • Vessels, as defined in 33 CFR 160;
  • Areas seaward of the shoreline to the outer edge of the Economic Exclusion Zone; and
  • Within the boundaries of the following waterfront facilities subject to the jurisdiction of DHS/USCG; those regulated by 33 CFR 126 (Dangerous cargo handling), 127 (LPG/LNG), 128 (Passenger terminals), 140 (Outer Continental Shelf Activities), 1541-56 (Waterfront portions of Oil & Hazmat bulk transfer facilities – delineated as per the NCP), 105 (Maritime security - facilities).
  • EPA is the coordinating agency for responses in areas of the coastal zone other than those defined above as certain areas of the coastal zone.
  • For incidents that have cross-boundary impacts, works with the other affected agency to determine how best to cooperatively respond consistent with the NCP model.
  • Serves as the coordinating agency for these incidents only during the prevention and emergency response phase, and transfers responsibility for later response phases to the appropriate agency, consistent with the NCP.
  • Because of its unique maritime jurisdiction and capabilities, is prepared to provide appropriate security, command and control, transportation, and support to other agencies that need to operate in the maritime domain.

Department of Housing and Urban Development

  • Reviews and reports on available housing for disaster victims and displaced persons.
  • Assists in planning for and placing homeless victims in available housing
  • Provides staff to support emergency housing within available resources.
  • Provides housing assistance and advisory personnel.

Department of the Interior (DOI)

  • Advises and assists in evaluating processes affecting radioisotopes in soils, including personnel, equipment, and laboratory support.
  • Advises and assists in the development of geographic information systems databases to be used in the analysis and assessment of contaminated areas, including personnel and equipment.
  • Advises and assists in assessing and dealing with impacts to natural resources, including fish and wildlife, subsistence uses, public lands, Indian tribal lands, land reclamation, mining, minerals, and water resources. Further guidance is provided in the Tribal Relations Support Annex and the ESF #11 – Agriculture and Natural Resources Annex.
  • Provides liaison between federally recognized tribal governments and Federal, State, and local agencies for coordination of response activities. Additionally, DOI advises and assists DHS on economic, social, and political matters in the U.S. insular areas should a radiological incident occur in these areas.

Department of Justice/Federal Bureau of Investigation

Coordinates all law enforcement and criminal investigative response to acts of terrorism, to include intelligence gathering, hostage negotiations, and tactical operations. Further details regarding the FBI response are outlined in the Terrorism Incident Law Enforcement and Investigation Annex.

Department of Labor/Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Provides advice and technical assistance to DHS, the coordinating agency, and State, local, and tribal governments concerning the health and safety of response workers implementing the policies and concepts in this annex.

Department of State

  • Coordinates foreign information-gathering activities and all contacts with foreign governments, except in cases where existing bilateral agreements permit direct agency-to-agency cooperation.
  • Conveys the U.S. Government response to foreign offers of assistance.

Department of Transportation

(See the ESF #1 – Transportation Annex for further information.) Provides technical advice and assistance on the transportation of radiological materials and the impact of the incident on the transportation infrastructure.

Department of Veterans Affairs

  • Provides medical assistance using the Medical Emergency Radiological Response Team.
  • Provides temporary housing.

Environmental Protection Agency

(See the Hazardous Materials Incident Annex for additional information.)

  • Serves as a coordinating agency, as identified in Table 1.
  • Provides resources, including personnel, equipment, and laboratory support (including mobile laboratories) to assist DOE in monitoring radioactivity levels in the environment.
  • Assumes coordination of Federal radiological monitoring and assessment responsibilities after the transition from DOE.
  • Assists in the development and implementation of a long-term monitoring plan and long-term recovery plan.
  • Provides nationwide environmental monitoring data from the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring Systems for assessing the national impact of the incident.
  • Develops Protective Action Guides in coordination with the FRPCC.
  • Recommends protective actions and other radiation protection measures.
  • Recommends acceptable emergency levels of radioactivity and radiation in the environment.
  • Prepares health and safety advice and information for the public.
  • Estimates effects of radioactive releases on human health and the environment.
  • Provides response and recovery actions to prevent, minimize, or mitigate a threat to public health, safety, or the environment caused by actual or potential releases of radioactive substances, including actions to detect, identify, contain, clean up, and dispose of such substances.
  • Assists and supports the NIRT, when activated.
  • Provides, in cooperation with other Federal agencies, the law enforcement personnel and equipment to conduct law enforcement operations and investigations for nuclear/radiological incidents involving criminal activity that are not terrorism related.

General Services Administration

(See the ESF #7 – Resource Support Annex for additional information.)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Serves as a coordinating agency, as identified in Table 1.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  • Serves as a coordinating agency, as identified in Table 1.
  • Provides technical assistance to include source term estimation, plume dispersion, and dose assessment calculations.
  • Provides assistance and recommendations concerning protective action measures as coordinating agency.
  • Provides assistance in Federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities.
  • For an incident at a facility licensed by the NRC or an Agreement State, or involving Atomic Energy Act licensed material:
  • he licensee takes action to mitigate the consequences of the incident and provides appropriate protective action recommendations to State, local, and tribal officials;
  • The NRC:
  • Performs an independent assessment of the incident and potential offsite consequences and, as appropriate, provides recommendations concerning any protective measures;
  • Performs oversight of the licensee, to include monitoring, evaluation of protective action recommendations, advice, assistance, and, as appropriate, direction; and
  • Dispatches, if appropriate, an NRC site team of technical experts to the licensee’s facility.
  • Under certain situations involving the protection of public health/safety or national security, the NRC may take possession of special nuclear materials and/or operate certain facilities regulated by the NRC.


 

 
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