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Handbook 10-60
August 2010

Intelligence

Articles:

Joint Enabling Capabilities Command Intelligence-Quick Reaction Team

Joint Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence

Joint Functional Component Command for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance

300th Military Intelligence Brigade (Linguist)

Biometrics Task Force

Joint Space Operations Center



Graphic showing United States Joint Forces Command logo

Joint Enabling Capabilities Command Intelligence-Quick Reaction Team

Mission

The Joint Enabling Capabilities Command (JECC) Intelligence-Quick Reaction Team (I-QRT) provides targeting and collection management expertise to joint task force (JTF) military and civilian intelligence professionals no later than 72 hours after notification or during events leading up to crisis or contingency operations.


Capabilities

When deployed, I-QRTs consist of up to four targeteers and four collection managers to support individual joint force commander requirements. These personnel are highly trained individuals maintaining specific qualifications in their respective areas of expertise and are tailored to support individual combatant command requirements.

When not deployed, I-QRT personnel become familiarized with theater requirements and procedures by regularly participating in exercises sponsored by combatant commands and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, conduct integration training with other joint enabling capabilities, and maintain proficiency in targeting and collection management skill sets.



Graphic showing

Legend:

CINC: Commander in Chief
J2: Joint Staff Intelligence Directorate



Organization

The I-QRT is a subordinate unit of the U.S. Joint Forces Command and one of four elements of the newly established JECC, which transitioned from the Standing Joint Force Headquarters in 2008. Since 2007, JECC's I-QRT has deployed in support of:

  • Operation Iraqi Freedom, Iraq, January-April 2007.
  • Other Coalition Forces, Iraq, April-October 2007.
  • International Security Assistance Force, Afghanistan, October 2007-April 2008.
  • Task Force Ramadi, March-November 2008.
  • U.S. Africa Command-Time-Sensitive Targeting Cell, August 2008-March 2009.
  • Numerous joint training exercises.

Contact Information

Phone: COMM: (757) 836-6555

Website: "http://www.jfcom.mil"




Graphic showing diagram of Joint Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence logo

Joint Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence

Mission

The Joint Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence (JUAS COE) mission is focused upon facilitating development and integration of common UAS operating standards; capabilities; concepts; technologies; doctrine; training; and tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP). Joint integrated solutions, which support improved system employment into the joint force, are developed by leveraging existing combatant command and service initiatives and activities. The command works with a broad community of practice to identify UAS training and employment shortfalls, including the Office of Secretary of Defense, the joint staff, the services, and unified commands, as well as interagency and multinational partners. These organizations participate in a biannual advisory council meeting to exchange information on UAS concerns and priorities.



Photo showing RQ-4 Global Hawk

RQ-4 Global Hawk



Photo showing MQ-8 Fire Scout

MQ-8 Fire Scout



Photo showing MQ-1 Predator

MQ-1 Predator



Capabilities

Organizational expertise includes UAS pilot/operator, UAS sensor operator, UAS mission commander, fires, ground maneuver, intelligence, weapon systems, data links, maritime operations, and airspace management. The command uses these skills to assess current capabilities and address shortfalls through the publication and implementation of joint recommendations across the doctrine, organization, training, material, leadership and education, personnel, facilities, and policy domain.

Command organization consists of three operational divisions:

  • Operations/Experiments Division. Conducts operational analysis to determine capability shortfalls and solutions for command and control of UAS in joint theater operations, national airspace integration, future operations, force structure, and doctrine.
  • Training Division. Facilitates and promotes interoperability through joint training objectives and standards among the services and coalition partners and the sharing of lessons learned and emerging TTP across the joint force.
  • Concepts Division. Maintains and updates the joint concept of operations for UAS to maintain relevancy with theater operations through the assessment of emerging applications and threats.


Photos showing UAS COE provides support to the joint operator and services by facilitating the development and integration of common UAS operating standards, capabilities, concepts, technologies, doctrine, training, and TTPs. Pictured clockwise from top left: MQ-9 Reaper, RQ-11 Raven, RQ-7 Shadow, and the MQ-5B Hunter


UAS COE provides support to the joint operator and services by facilitating the development and integration of common UAS operating standards, capabilities, concepts, technologies, doctrine, training, and TTPs. Pictured clockwise from top left: MQ-9 Reaper, RQ-11 Raven, RQ-7 Shadow, and the MQ-5B Hunter.



Organization

The JUAS COE, headquartered at Creech Air Force Base, NV, reports directly to the U.S. Joint Forces Command. The JUAS COE was created in 2005 by the Joint Requirements Oversight Committee to optimize the employment of UAS into the joint force.


Contact Information

Phone: COMM: (702) 404-1527

Website: "https://us.jfcom.mil/sites/juas/pages/default.aspx"




Graphic showing United States Strategic Command logo

Joint Functional Component Command for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance

Mission

In support of U.S. Strategic Command's (USSTRATCOM) global intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission, the Joint Functional Component Command for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (JFCC-ISR) develops strategies and plans; integrates national, Department of Defense (DOD), and international partner capabilities; and executes DOD ISR operations to satisfy combatant command (COCOM) and national operational and intelligence requirements.



Photo showing Defense Intelligence Analysis Center at Bolling Air Force Base, home of JFCC-ISR

Defense Intelligence Analysis Center at Bolling Air Force Base, home of JFCC-ISR



Capabilities

The JFCC-ISR plans, executes, and integrates ISR activities in support of USSTRATCOM's strategic and global missions. The JFCC-ISR area of interest (AOI) extends worldwide-from underwater to space-and overlays, but does not affect, other areas of responsibilities assigned to COCOMs. This AOI includes the full spectrum of military needs including transnational threats, weapons of mass destruction, and the Overseas Contingency Operation. The component's four divisions-operations, plans and strategy, assessments, and special activities-execute the following:

  • Develop and maintain a global situational awareness display of deployed ISR.
  • Participate in adaptive planning to support COCOM's intelligence campaign planning efforts.
  • Recommend allocation strategies based on operational and intelligence requirements.
  • Help COCOMs synchronize DOD collection with activities of national/international ISR collectors.
  • Recommend actions to persuade or dissuade adversaries through the use of ISR operations.
  • Manage the special activities approval process to synchronize and optimize use of ISR assets.
  • Help develop courses of action and options to mitigate consequent risks and gaps.
  • Use modeling/simulation tools to test support plans and determine optimal allocation of ISR assets.
  • Assess, identify, and define gaps, shortfalls, priorities, and redundancies of ISR capabilities.
  • Integrate ISR special activities in support of COCOM requirements.

Organization

The JFCC-ISR is a subordinate command of USSTRATCOM and collocated with the Defense Intelligence Agency at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. JFCC-ISR has ready access to all 16 agencies of the intelligence community.


Contact Information

Websites:

  • "http://www.stratcom.mil/factsheets/isr/"
  • "http://www.dia.mil/"



Graphic showing 300th Military Intelligence Brigade logo

300th Military Intelligence Brigade (Linguist)

Mission

The 300th Military Intelligence (MI) Brigade (Linguist) provides language and MI support to U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) subordinate units, other war trace commands, Army theater commands, and the Department of Defense in multiple contingencies.


Capabilities

The 300th MI Brigade (Linguist) provides trained and ready linguist and MI Soldiers to commanders from brigade through Army level. The brigade human intelligence (HUMINT) skills include collectors (interrogators, translators, and interpreters) and counterintelligence agents as well. The signals intelligence skills include Soldiers who are trained in voice intercept and as analysts.

The 300th MI Brigade (Linguist) provides support in 19 documented languages. Arabic, Persian-Farsi, and Korean are heavily represented, and the brigade can provide support in other regionally important languages. Major conflict languages, with closely associated countries, make up 60 percent of the unit's structure.

The brigade has 1,400 linguist team positions, which have changed radically over the past several years and will continue to transform to meet the Army Language Master Plan.


Organization

A component of INSCOM, the 300th MI Brigade (Linguist) is an Army National Guard element with headquarters in Draper, Utah. Its battalions are in Washington, California, Florida, Utah, and Louisiana, with companies in Massachusetts and Illinois, and a separate team in Guam.

The six battalions of the 300th MI Brigade (Linguist) are partially deployed to support current operations, and others are preparing for continued rotations. The mission of the 300th MI Brigade (Linguist) has always been to provide task-organized force packages to support the warfighting commander. The units of the 300th MI Brigade (Linguist) have proven invaluable in U.S. military operations worldwide, from the Gulf War to current operations in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kosovo, Iraq, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Cuba. Three battalions (141st, 142rd, and 223rd) developed intelligence that led to victorious actions in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), including the capture of prominent figures of the former Iraqi regime including, reportedly, Saddam Hussein. Soldiers from the 223rd MI Battalion comprise more than 30 percent of the tactical HUMINT teams and operational management teams available during OIF.


Contact Information

Phone:

  • COMM: (801) 432-4260
  • DSN: 766-4260

Website: "http://www.inscom.army.mil"




Graphic showing Biometrics Task Force logo

Biometrics Task Force

Mission

The biometrics task force (BTF) leads Department of Defense (DOD) activities to program, integrate, and synchronize biometric technologies and capabilities and to operate and maintain DOD's authoritative biometric database in support of the National Security Strategy.


Capabilities

The BTF will:

  • Act as the DOD proponent for biometrics.
  • Lead in the development and implementation of biometric technologies for combatant commands (COCOMs), services, and agencies.
  • Partner with all services' training and doctrine entities to leverage existing documentation and develop new analysis documentation to enable establishment of formal programs of record.
  • Deliver capabilities to contribute to the enhancement of the biometrics community.
  • Increase joint service interoperability.
  • Empower the warfighter by improving operational effectiveness on the battlefield.

Biometrics systems currently in use:

  • Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS).
  • Biometric Automated Toolset.
  • Biometric Identification System for Access.
  • Defense Biometric Identification System.
  • Handheld Interagency Identification Detection Equipment.

Ongoing Initiatives

The BTF developed and operates the DOD ABIS, an enterprise-level, multimodal biometric database. To that extent, the BTF maintains a secure, controlled repository for multimodal biometric templates and images for use in evaluating fusion concepts and potential solutions. The BTF is also involved in developing security criteria to ensure biometrics products meet established federal information assurance guidelines.


Future Initiatives

The BTF is enabling the establishment of biometrics footholds throughout the COCOMs using the current biometrics cells in Iraq and Afghanistan as models. The intent is for an expeditionary element of the BTF to deploy to a given COCOM to provide the initial framework and subject-matter expertise to establish a biometrics element within its headquarters. Thereafter, the BTF will serve as the primary reachback clearinghouse for biometrics-related issues and requests for information until such time as the COCOM biometrics cell is manned and equipped to operate autonomously.


Organization

Housed primarily in Arlington, VA, and Clarksburg, WV, the BTF operates through the executive agent authority given to the Secretary of the Army and delegated to the chiefs of staff for operations, plans, and information engagement. The BTF executes day-to-day biometrics functions and leads coordination for strategic movement forward for all parts of the DOD in cooperation with the director of defense biometrics and biometrics project manager.


Contact Information

Phone: COMM: (304) 326-3023

Website: "www.biometrics.dod.mil"




Graphic showing Joint Space Operations Center logo

Joint Space Operations Center

Mission

The mission of the Joint Space Operations Center (JSPOC) is to provide the commander, Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC SPACE) with agile and responsive command and control (C2) capabilities to conduct space operations on a 24/7 basis. The JSPOC is built around an air and space operations center adapted specifically for space missions and global operations and provides reachback to combatant commanders' space coordinating authorities (SCAs).


Capabilities

The purpose of the JSPOC is to provide a focal point for the operational employment of worldwide joint space forces, and enables the JFCC SPACE commander to integrate space power into global military operations. The JSPOC:

  • Provides operational-level space C2 support to the JFCC SPACE commander.
  • Provides space situational awareness (SSA) and maintains the single integrated space picture that is shared with combatant commanders and appropriate SSA users.
  • Plans, directs, controls, integrates, and assesses space operations on behalf of the commander, U.S. Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) and the JFCC SPACE commander.
  • Supports the inter-theater responsibilities of the JFCC SPACE commander and coordinates with theater SCAs.
  • Develops courses of action and plans, and executes military space operations.
  • Provides day-to-day operations with JSPOC crews. When a space-related incident or contingency requiring enhanced space support occurs, the JSPOC assesses the situation and notifies the appropriate operations centers within USSTRATCOM and the National Military Command Center, as necessary.

Three products are used to plan and execute JFCC SPACE forces in support of the mission: The space operations directive (SOD), the master space plan (MSP), and a weekly joint space tasking order (JSTO).

  • The SOD is a weekly assertion of the JFCC SPACE commander's intent and gives him overall visibility into the efforts of the subordinate units assigned to his tactical control (TACON).
  • The MSP visually details how joint space forces will support both the JFCC SPACE commander, and theater commanders, and guides the creation of the weekly JSTO.
  • The JSTO functions as the JFCC SPACE commander's execution order. The JSTO tasks the JFCC SPACE commander's TACON units with specific missions.

All three products can be effectively matched to synchronize with ongoing exercises or real-world wartime operations in any geographic combatant command.

Combat operations effectively monitor the execution phase of operations and provide information on tasking responses to the JFCC SPACE commander, the other JSPOC divisions, upper command echelons, and theater space personnel for their SSA. In doing so, they create the single integrated space picture. The intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) division is integrated into all phases of the operational cycle, providing pertinent space intelligence information to the other three divisions in support of the strategy, planning, and operations monitoring efforts.


Organization

The JSPOC, located at Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA, is a synergistic command and control weapon system focused on planning and executing USSTRATCOM's JFCC SPACE mission. The JSPOC includes the personnel, facilities, and equipment necessary to provide the JFCC SPACE commander the ability to plan and execute worldwide space forces. The JSPOC is composed of four core divisions: strategy, combat plans, combat operations, and ISR.


Contact Information

The JSPOC's SSA operations cell maintains space data for all Earth-orbiting, man-made objects. JSPOC unclassified space data is available for authorized U.S. government personnel and U.S. government support contractors. To access the JSPOC site data files, you must have a valid USSTRATCOM Form-1 and GCSS-AF Form 41 on file with the JFCC SPACE/J95 office.

Phone:

  • COMM: (805) 605-0813
  • DSN: 275-0813

Website: "http://www.stratcom.mil"



 

 
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