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Handbook 10-19
January 2010

Chapter 3

Maintenance and Supply Readiness

Maintenance Readiness

Commanders should be familiar with the supply procedures to monitor an effective maintenance readiness program. Commanders must emphasize the importance of establishing and implementing effective maintenance and supply procedures in all elements of their equipment readiness. Commanders must ensure that unserviceable repairable items, critical items, intensively managed items, and automatic return items are returned to retrograde channels within the timeframes required within 10 working days (30 days for U.S. Army Reserve [USAR]) after receipt of the new item Army Regulation (AR) 710-2, Supply Policy Below the National Level, para 2-6.

Commanders use information on materiel and unit readiness reports to analyze, predict, and make decisions on each unit's ability to perform its mission. These reports are completed both during deployments and garrison operations and are useful only if they are timely, accurate, and complete. The materiel readiness of an organization reflects the capability of assigned equipment or systems to accomplish their missions. This is the reason for commanders and leaders to emphasize adherence to the maintenance standard.

Commanders must review the reconciliation report generated from the Standard Army Retail Supply System (SARSS) to manage their maintenance operations. The reconciliation report shows the balance between the SARSS-1 records and the customer open records. Commanders must review the reconciliation report monthly to ensure requisitions have a valid supply status according to AR 725-50, Requisitioning, Receipt, and Issue System, table C-31. The reconciliation report is generated monthly from the SARSS-1 system at the supporting supply support activity (SSA).

Accountable officers are required to have customer units validate and reconcile open supply requests each month, and quarterly in the Army National Guard (ARNG) and USAR (according to Department of the Army [DA] Pamphlet [Pam] 710-2-2, Supply Support Activity Supply System: Manual Procedures, para 19-1).

Unit leaders should visit the supporting SSA and review the status of the open, high-priority requests weekly.

Prescribe Load List/Shop Supply List Management

The shop supply list (SSL) is replacing the prescribe load list (PLL) through the Standard Army Maintenance System-Enhanced (SAMS-1E/2E). The SSL has the same goal as the PLL (i.e., demand supported, non-demand support), but not all repair parts stocked on an SSL are demand supported.

The SSL is kept to support a unit's daily maintenance operation. Units authorized personnel, tools, and equipment to perform field level maintenance will normally keep an SSL. The SSL operates under the Unit Level Logistic System-Ground/Aviation (ULLS-G/A). (Note: Refer to AR 710-2, para 2-21 and DA Pam 710-2-1, chapter 8, for more guidance on PLL management.)

Commanders need to ensure motor pools conduct the SSL review of demands and make adjustments based on supported requirements. The SSL consists of a set of essential Class IX (repair parts) assets stocked at the unit level and is designed to support critical and crucial end items reported to DA via the unit status report (USR) (AR 220-1, Unit Status Reporting). Improper and untimely turn-ins of recoverable items can lessen the unit allocated funds and will affect the spending for future requirements. Furthermore, proper supply procedures enhance unit maintenance. It is vital for maintenance personnel to follow supply procedures and for commanders to implement tools that check and assess maintenance readiness.

Commanders must understand the automated SSL systems that perform and manage their shop supply. The functionality of ULLS-G/SAMS-E provides the management of the maintenance process and supply information of unit level supply, motor pool, and aviation units. Both systems enhance unit readiness by providing the capability to manage equipment use and track readiness. Commanders should ensure their PLL/SSL clerks are tasked to:

  • Know what Class IX repair parts and quantities are authorized in the unit.
  • Ensure stock locations and quantities on hand match PLL/SSL records.
  • Track the issue of repair parts.
  • Ensure all repair parts are secured and protected from damage.
  • Ensure excess repair parts are turned in according to appropriate turn-in procedures.
  • Ensure the commander or designated representative initials the commander's exception report for high priority requests.
  • Reconcile the document register with the supporting SSA.
  • Reconcile the commander's financial transaction listing with the document register.
  • Understand the Army Maintenance Management Systems records and SSL function interface (DA Pam 750-3, Soldiers' Guide for Field Maintenance Operations, figure 3-1).

Supply Support Activity Management and Performance Standards

The Command Supply Discipline Program (CSDP) also concerns the management of Class IX assets at the SSA levels (AR 710-2). Proper accountability and availability of stocks at the SSAs play a vital role in the equipment readiness of the unit, in addition to providing the combat capabilities needed to fight and win. The management of SSAs includes but is not limited to: having the amount of supplies needed for deployment, monitoring of performance metrics, reviewing stocks, and conducting inventories.

As the Army transforms to a modular force, it cannot afford ineffective or inadequate inventories in deployed or garrison SSAs. The authorized stockage list (ASL) is the document authorizing units to maintain assets at the SSAs. Commanders will achieve authorization to stock the ASL's highly required items that support the maintenance of required equipment. Effective ASLs have a great impact on combat readiness and capabilities. ASLs are built by conducting yearly reviews (more frequently if required or when in combat) while analyzing customer demands. The management of these assets is conducted by following routine, monthly, quarterly, and annual processes such as inventories and surveys.

The role of the SSA in sustaining readiness is measured in terms of effective customer support by ensuring the proper amount of supplies are on hand, timely customer requests and receipt processing, inventory accuracy, and deployment and mobility rates (see Table 3-1).

 

Measure

DA Goal

Table of Organization and Equipment SSA

Installation SSA

U.S. Property and Fiscal Office (USPFO)

General Support (GS) SSA

Mission Supply Support Activity (MSSA)

Medical Supply, Optical, and Maintenance (MEDSOM)

Other Table of Distribution and Allowances (TDA) SSA

Zero balance w/due outs

8%

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Material release denial

1%

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Inventory accuracy

95%

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Receipt processing

24 hours

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Request processing

24 hours

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Daily cycles

Once per week day

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Location survey

98%

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Inventory adjustment

5% requisition objectives (RO) of dollar value

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Table 3-1. SSA Performance Standards (AR 710-2, Table 1-3)

 

ASL inventories

Inventories are tools that prevent mismanagement of assets to help maintain accuracy of asset availability. There are three types of ASL inventories in the SSAs:

wall to wall, special, and scheduled cyclic. These requirements apply in garrison and in deployed environments. ASL location surveys are critical before an inventory by helping SSA personnel ensure locations and assigned assets are accurate and recorded in SARSS (see Table 3-2).

 

Special Inventory

Wall to Wall Inventory

Scheduled Cyclic

Causative research

Change of accountable officer

10% monthly

Location survey inaccuracy

Command annual requirement

Quarterly sensitive

Pseudo receipts

Prescribed

SSA open for business

Denials

Less desired

Minimum disruption in customer support

Directed

Closed up to 5 days and 10 days for USAR and ARNG

Continues high-priority support

Processing 01-03 priority report continues

Minimum customer disruption

Table 3-2. Inventory chart

 

ASL review process

The Army's mandatory method for computing the demands and stockage of ASL items is the integrated logistics program dollar cost banding (DCB). (Deployed units use the enhanced dollar cost banding system.) This method allows commanders and unit logisticians to analyze demands that will help decide additions or deletions of lines and increases or decreases of quantity adjustments to RO. DCB is a program for recommendations and is a tool to help managers create the optimum ASL for supporting unit mission and readiness. ASL reviews help optimize demand satisfaction, demand accommodation, and reduces customer wait times for critical parts/supplies.

 

Graphic showing Exchange Pricing

Figure 3-3 Exchange Pricing

Exchange pricing is the business process of one-for-one credit policy for selected recoverable items (Class II [clothing, individual equipment, tools, and administrative supplies], Class VII [personal and demand items], and Class IX [repair parts]) contained in Defense Finance and Accounting Service-Indianapolis regulation, Finance and Accounting Policy Implementation, 37-1. Exchange pricing tracks and validates issues and turn-ins of all exchange pricing national stock numbers. Exchange pricing consists of four objectives:

  • Establish customer's buy-one/return-one relationship.
  • Establish a dual-pricing system.
  • Eliminate unserviceable credit for tactical customers.
  • Capitalize tactical repairable (direct support/repair exchange) SSA stocks.

Exchange pricing will track the issue of a serviceable national stock number (NSN) from the date the item is received at the SSA until the completion of either an unserviceable or serviceable turn-in. This is a critical part of the exchange pricing policy since a unit will have 60 days to turn in the item to the SSA. If units continue to use the current policy contained in AR 750-1, Army Materiel Maintenance Policy, chapter 4, they will have no issues meeting the 60-day suspense under the exchange pricing program, which is known as the Delta delay period. Failure to meet the 60-day suspense will result in a Delta bill, which will charge the unit full price for an item. Commanders need to ensure the following under exchange pricing:

  • Turn-ins must match both Department of Defense activity address code/NSN in order to match the issue on the Delta delay period.
  • The process matches customer issues against:
    • Oldest inactive repairable turn-in.
    • Oldest inactive condemned turn-in.
    • Oldest active reparable turn-in.
    • Oldest active condemned turn-in.
  • The exchange pricing program takes into consideration the reversal of funds if there was a denial and a transaction was processed out of sequence.
  • Unserviceable exchange pricing turn-ins will purge if there is no matching issue within 365 days.

Note: Exchange pricing information is located at "http://www.ssf.army.mil".


 

 
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